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conference with president obama. let's listen in. >> the deep bonds between the people of the united states and india and a historic opportunity we have to strengthen the partnership between our nations. india today is a rising and responsible global power. in asia, indian leadership is expanding prosperity and security across the region. and the united states welcomes and encourages india's leadership role in helping to shape the rise of a stable, peaceful and prosperous asia. beyond asia, the world's largest multiethnic democracy is one of the world's fastest growing economies and as a member of the g-2 o india will play a pivotal role in meeting the major challenges we face today. and this includes my top economic priority, creating good jobs with good wages for the the american people. so i believe the relationship between the united states and india will be one of the defining partnerships of the 21st century. and this visit underscores the strengthening of that partnership, which i hope will continue throughout my presidency. that's why i have made it a priority to broaden the coopera
of the united states to take a look at your antitrust exemption. york $8 billion organization has not taken seriously responsibility to the players. a fact of the matter is, if yes, people want to play. they are going to be injured and we know that no matter what kind of helmet you build, no matter what kind of equipment that you have, it is a dangerous sport. people are going to be injured. the only question is, what you going to do -- are you going to pay the injured player and their family for the injuries that they have received and how can you be a multi-billion operation? se profits, but i think the responsibility of this congress is to take a look at that anti--trust exemption that you have. in my estimation, take it away. i yield back the balance of my time. >> i thank the gentlewoman for her modest suggestions. [laughter] the chair recognizes howard from north carolina. >> thank you, mr. chairman. what does the alumni association have to say to active pro, college and high school players about the importance of early and completely presenting to team physicians any sims that may ha
the united states and india have not always been one. during the cold war, many saw india as unfriendly, which it might have been. during -- at the end of the cold war, there were opportunities to securitized. in the past several years, there has been a lifting of sanctions culminating in the historic civil nuclear accord. now, there@@@@@@h@ @ @ @ @ @ @ r strategic partnership. there is a need for wide ranging consultation to in grain habits of consultation -- to ingrain minister for being here. i want to welcome his entire delegation, including his most able ambassador and want to thank the gentleman standing here, lee hamilton, who is president and director of the woodrow wilson international center. i could not be more pleased to introduce the prime minister. lee hamilton resented the ninth district in the u.s. house of representatives and he is a model of what a legislator of to be. -- ought to be. congressman hamilton? [applause] >> good evening to you all and thank you for coming. i told the prime minister a moment ago that he was appearing before an extraordinary washington audie
the united states and india can strengthen the global economic recovery, promote trade that creates jobs for both our people and pursue growth that is balanced and sustained. as nuclear powers we can be full partners in preventing the spread of the world's most deadly weapons, securing loose nuclear materials from terrorists, and pursuing our shared vision of a world without nuclear weapons. >> india and america are separated by distance but bound together by the values of democracy, rule of law and respect for fundamental human freedoms. >> reporter: there's also some hard cash involved in this. american businesses are looking at india and seeing dollar signs because as you look at their infrastructure rebuilding, ports, airports, roads, etc., the chamber of commerce predicts they could over the next five years, u.s. companies could make $500 billion. this is also a good deal. >> what do both sides get out of this state visit? >> reporter: i think the united states gives india what it wants which is recognition that it is a very important country in the world right now, that in spite of
of the united states. finally, i just think it's important to point out someone who remembers working in the white house before the state dinner would happen, it's the entire building is a buzz and it's really a way of sort of literally rolling out the red carpet of the united states to another member of the world community and it's such an important symbolic act. it can't be overstated to show that the united states wants to engage the rest of the world and show the united states respects cultures from around the world and let's not forget the president won by asian americans by a large margin so an important symbol here at home to that community. >> danny, as we wait to see the president and prime minister step out, we know they are behind closed doors and part of the conversation is certainly afghanistan and pakistan. you've got vice president dick cheney coming out critical of the administration saying it was dithering but what about making india a key player in whatever happens in afghanistan regarding the strategy? >> i would have to agree. i think our relationship with india wi
finishing the job, the president should be aware that the jobs people are worried about in the united states are getting people back to work. we have 15 million people out of work. our priorities are skies are sk. why are we worrying about afghanistan? it really raises questions about the extent of the pentagon's influence on the administration. >> why do you think the president is doing it? many people thought the president came from the same side of the tracks that you're on, generally speaking, in terms of the u.s. limits of power in the world and the need to rejoin the world community and not to be hawkish. what do you make of his decision? why do you think he moved that direction? >> well, i think it's going to be a tough point to defend. and you're right about that the -- we've seen the limits of u.s. coercion. and this government in afghanistan is a corrupt government. everyone knows that. sooner or later, the kind of consensus government which afghanistan has had historically is going to have to be reinstituted so people in afghanistan will have control over their own destiny. we're
be a good idea to admit the deposed and ailing shah of iran, to the united states for medical treatment. well, two weeks later we found ourselves in the embassy behind a steel door on the second floor of the old chancellor ri, the dearly-beloved henderson high that some of you may remember. and on the other side banging on the, banging on the door were this group of unhappy, unhappy iranians. well, it befell to me to -- having made one of probably the worst decisions of my foreign service career -- to go out from that door, to go out from behind the door and attempt, and i use this word with some trepidation, to negotiate with this, with this crowd to see if there was something we could do. maybe we could get them out or at least delay them because what was very clear to us already was that there was, we were on our own. that if anything was going to be done, we had to do it. we had made calls to the iranian government at the time or at least what passed for the iranian government, something called the provisional government of iran. and it was very clear from that contact that there wa
in congress. i believe in the united states. don't get me started on that. but i believe you have power that others of us don't and that's why we elect you to this office. as a constituent with six grandchildren, i'm asking you to please help the youth of our day now and the future football players of tomorrow to stay safe. call it an osha deal, call it anything you want. but they go from being our youth in america to our employees. and we have, i believe, as americans, an obligation to make this a safer sport. >> i appreciate that. the last comment, mr. chairman, as i mentioned, you're not the only person, grant you, i have 7.5 and four kids and i think it's the parents role at the very early age to take care of the safety of their children. i certainly don't think the federal government has a role in intervene in that. but congress may have a role in making sure that there may be some funds for research and development. but getting involved in the every day operation of an nfl football team, congress is not qualified to do that. maybe we should do -- stick to what we know best. with t
of the reasons that have been worried is the united states's focus on pakistan and the anti-terrorist strategy. they could say it was in the interest to focus on pakistan. >> shore. if you think of the region, as it was until recently, including islamabad, this is part of a spectrum. how much will to separate this, i'd think it is better to focus on the way it on how to bring india in and bring more cooperation begun to stabilize the whole region together. the net think the discussions and the two sides will have an understanding of how to proceed. >> just to look at money in business, with this relationship, a lot of it has to do with profit and economics. the nuclear deal to do a great deal to create jobs on both sides. >> absolutely. i think that once that is done reactors will be sold, but also, they will make the pitch for liberalizing the technology. i think once we open the door as well, there will be huge advances in trade, which has been growing quite fast and is quite balanced unlike in the case of india and china. the trade is more balanced. there is a big move to come into the unit
the rest of us in the country. jim cantore tracking the weather in the rest of the united states. >> reporter: second busiest airport in the world through here. if you just showed this video today i would not think that this is probably a thanksgiving travel day. grant it, we are at terminal three, and this is a united hub which is terminal 1. this is not that bad. people are coming in and doing what they have to do, and some people peeved at the surcharge they have to pay for the first time this year, and everybody seems ton getti be getting alon. all in all, i would think, and i have been here before this would be busier at this time. airline travel down 62% since the year 2000. not surprising here. we will see rain rotate into chicago for tonight. i don't know if it will delay things, really. maybe a brief ground stop. that's all we are seeing in atlanta this morning. another piece to the system is coming down on wednesday night and thursday. that may give us enough for a white thanksgiving for chicago, and right now it's a warm city at 45 degrees. back to you, dylan? >> thank
're not big enough. this is a united states senator so even though we're friends, we're close, we're brothers in christ, we need power to confront this. senator tom coburn. the hit man. >> reporter: senator tom coburn of oklahoma is one of the most influential conservative voices in the united states senate and also a c street resident. marchton said on valentine's day the c street leadership and senator coburn helped him confronts senator ensign. >> tom really kind of takes the helm. >> reporter: so how angry is tom coburn at this point? >> oh, he's smoking. he's one upset man. and then john kind of breaks down a little bit. i don't know what to say. i made a mistake. i really screwed up. >> reporter: hampton provided us with this letter which he says the group of c street forced him to wright to sinsddy. i used you for my own pressure, he wrote. god never intendsed for us to do this. according to hampton, within hours, john ensign calls sinsddy. >> he is just lived. he made him write a letter, but it's not how i feel. doug has exposed me. as though somehow i'm the bad guy in this. >> report
about climate change. where india and the united states are actually both having a little difficulty taming this issue domestically. we both had serious domestic problems with what we would like to do. >> reporter: and this visit comes just as president obama is completing his strategy on afghanistan and actually india plays a key role in that equation. the united states thinks that the animosity between india and pakistan is actually having a bad effect on the efforts in afghanistan with india more focused, sometimes, on the threat from pakistan than it is on the threat from the taliban. john? >> jill dougherty for us at the white house, thanks so much. >>> in the next hour and a half or next half hour, susan malveaux has a behind the scenes look at what it takes to throw a state dinner. wait until you hear about the guests that come to these dinners and leave with the silv silverware. >> nice and classy there. >>> a critical warning for new moms and dads. the consumer product safety commission is recalling 2.1 million cribs. this is the biggest crib recall in history. they're telli
, you can call us and here in the united states at one 877-742-5751, just say hey rick and then your spiel. >>> hey rick, in reference to the afghanistan war, the reason i'm against it is because of one word, terrain, terrain, our boys are not trained to in that terrain. i suggest we bring them out of there and use the big bombs, the big bombs that penetrate the earth and flatten the tunnels, flatten the mountains where the tunnels are on the border. (announcer) we understand. you want time to enjoy the holidays. >>> it's great that the commander in chief is sending over the troops, but he's also sending over beans, bullets and band-aids so i'm concerned about what the morale is there on the actual ground. i'm not too concerned about what the officers think, but what the actual troops, your lance corporals, your corporals, the sergeants and the people who are actually fighting the war and who are actually being shot at. >>> this information we have been sharing with you is getting a lot of heat and a lot of reaction all over the country. this is just during the break, a sampling of s
president of the united states, not head of the republican party, she needs to broaden her coalition. the problem with that -- >> this country -- they might do it again. thank you ron brownstein, chris cilliz cillizza. join us tomorrow night at 5:00 eastern for more "hardball." time for "the ed show" with ed schultz zblrngs good evening, americans. welcome to "the ed show" tonight from new york. one week from tonight the president of the united states is going to lay out his strategy for afghanistan. newspapers are reporting today that the president will add, here's the number, 34,000 additional troops over the next year. president obama gave a preview to this decision this afternoon. >> after eight years, some of those years in which we did not have, i think, either the resources or the strategy to get the job done, it is my intention to finish the job. >> finish the job. make no mistake, this is just one more mess that president obama has to mop up after the bush administration. bush was the president who drained resources from afghanistan so we could go invade iraq on that perfect
. >>> plus, is the united states still a superpower? the president came back from his trip to asia pretty much empty handed. we're fighting two wars, our economy is in tatters. has the sun set on the american empire. >> for the last 20 years the united states has had no rivals. we now have serious competitors. >>> should religion be used as a political weapon? patrick kennedy says he's been told not to take communion because of his support for abortion rights. >> he said the fact that i don't agree with all the teachings of the church doesn't make me less of a catholic. well, in fact it >> should this be part of politics. >>> and a story that seems like science fiction but it's all true. doctors discover a man who seemed to be in a coma for 23 years actually heard every word they said. the amazing true story of what he calls his second birth. >>> this is your only source for news. cnn primetime begins now. here's campbell brown. >>> hi, everybody, we're going to start tonight as always with the "mash-up." we're watching it all so you don't have to. first, tonight, there is breaking news f
threat to the united states. >> woodruff: we heard the president say today when the american people hear our rationale, we think they will come along. >> maybe. >> woodruff: that's what he made. >> maybe. a lot of that has to do with the perception of whether the united states can win there and people don't judge the military situation very well. and whether the afghanistan... the people in after dan stan... the afghanistan government can succeed after we've left. there are a a lot of doubts on the part of the public about that. >> woodruff: josh gerstein, pull some of this together. what are the political forces out there weighing on the president? >> here's what i think the basic problem is. it is that we may know by 2011 or 2012 whether the decision the president is about to announce is a success. we may know whether there's better traction for the u.s. mission in afghanistan. we're probably not going to know about the time members of congress face re-election in november of next year. in fact, not all the troops that the president is expected to send there will even be in country by
that india's partnership with the united states is going to play an influential role in the 21st century. the two leaders discussed several pressing issues, including nuclear deals, climate change as well as the economy. >> mr. president, i bring to you and the people of the united states of america the friendly greetings of over 1 billion people of india. >> as leading economies, the united states and india can strengthen the global economic recovery, promote trade that creates jobs for both our people and pursue growth that is balanced and sustained. as nuclear powers, we can be full partners in preventing the spread of the world's most deadly weapons, securing loose nuclear materials from terrorists and pursuing our shared vision of a world without nuclear weapons. >> in less than three hours, the president and the first lady will host a state dinner for prime minister singh at the white house. now it's the obamas' first state dinner, and the question, of course, why was india's leader chosen for such an historic honor. our senior foreign affairs correspondent jill dougherty explains.
had a choice, go back to boss the kneia, or end up in the united states. they went to chicago. >> that's when i finally felt like you can enjoy life now, we've made it. you can relax now. you know, it's yours, so, you know, i always, like, wanted to have a house i could have friends over and stuff, and every day, like, since we had the house, i always have people over, there's not like one day where my mom is not cooking for everyone. but in bosnia, it's just like that. you always have family over, friends over, you're grilling. >> reporter: and from there, life was good. boggio starred in soccer, and now he's getting plenty of playing time for the fire. >> i can't really describe like how you feel, like -- because you, like, you remember, when you go back, it all comes back to you like everything happened yesterday, and its just like, you know, it's -- you try to make it happy where you get to see your family again, but as soon as like that goes away, like, wow, like i left all of this behind. what if i didn't have this sort of future? >> reporter: and so you can understand when the
east and the united states did not arm israel in their wars, we never would have suffered 9/11. i do nothing anyone would have heard the name osama bin laden. we are going to be there for years and years. they talk about raising taxes on the ridge to pay for this war. they will be paying for it forever. thank you. host: the first official state dinner will be taking place in washington, "obama was big tent leaves out gop big wigs -- obama's big tent believes that gop big wigs. chief among for those not coming, john maynard -- john boehner and eric cantor. the president did not invite john mccain, even though mr. obama pledged a post-partisan presidency. -- presidency." we will have live coverage of the dinner giving way under -- getting way tonight at 9:00. there is also a press conference that will happen at 11:30 eastern time. the arrival ceremony was originally scheduled for the south lawn, it will be moving to the east room. lester, good morning from detroit. caller: good morning. listen, i do not have any problem with the rich being taxed for this war. over the years, you know,
. those are things that are are unpopular. and he's a president of the united states being told by the military, mr. president, we can't defend those outposts and we need more people to do a countersurge insurgency. and i guess it these are correct and they puts 43,000 troops in, imagine the progressiveness, with the troops, if you don't advance health care. i think he'll find 10,000 and train the army because he's politically unsustainable with his base, if he puts in 43,000 troops and prosecutes afghanistan during a water with afghanistan as president, i think he'll have a democrat primary and that we'll have a substantial split mountain democrat party, if that's what he does. and i would argue this -- for our party, and the tensions between our kind of economic votes and our religious conservatives, the fact that the energy in republican party is about spending and deficit, if we're so inept we can't take these people and make them part of a new coalition, they we oughting to nothinged. the -- this are 24% of the people in this country who say they would likely vote for a thi
, india has become more and more important to the united states. worldwide, its influence economically, politically, is growing. and yet, there's a certain perception in india that they are not getting the attention that they really should be getting. that the united states is right now focused on china, a lot of attention on the neighbor, pakistan, because of afghanistan. so this is a way of reassuring them that it's really, really important. and no matter what issue you look at right now in the world, heidi, india is really important. climate change, energy, relations with china, you name it. they are very important. >> all right, jill dougherty for us this morning, thank you, jill. >>> this morning, big news on the economy and where it is headed. just minutes ago, the commerce department lowered its figure on the gross domestic product. of course, the gdp, a big deal, because it measures all the goods and services within the country, and therefore, is considered one of the broadest measures of the economy. so, what does the gdp mean to you and your wallet? the impact may be much gre
. and he gets a fair trial. we are very good at having criminal trials in the united states. this is something we do well. they're fair, respected and if appropriate, people get the death penalty. it seems to me a trial where he spends a day on the witness stand saying whatever it is he wants to say is a small price to pay for a legitimate, honest, fair, internationally recognized trial. >> there's some talk about how political the trial has become. the debate hearing these days, is it about the justice system in this country and proving it works well? also justice for the victims of 9/11 or has this become, especially in washington, more of another political football? >> you know, this has been a political football for a long time. it goes all the way back to george w. bush when he signed the original order creating the commissions. people ask what are we going to call these people, accused criminals? are we going to call them combatants? do we think they committed crimes? do we think they committed acts of war or both? what the administration essentially has come down on a
. the entertainment should be pretty cool. plus the national symphony and you have the wonderful united states marine band. >> lynn sweet, lynn, thanks so much. appreciate it, as always. >> thank you. >>> and david, in the bigger picture, what is the significance of president obama choosing india as the first country to host a state dinner? here's what the president said today after a two-hour meeting with the prime minister. >> india will play a pivotal role in meeting the major challenges that we face today. and this includes my top economic priority, creating good jobs with good wages for the american people. so i believe that the relationship between the united states and india will be one of the defining partnerships of the 21st century. >> and joining us live is nbc's chief foreign affairs correspondent, andrea mitchell, also the host of "andrea mitchell reports" right here on msnbc. thanks, andrea, for joining us. >> great to be here. >> let's start off with jobs and broadening trade ties. the president talked about the need for employment and how these two countries are linked very much that
in the world. they used to be the united states united states lost that in the financial crisis. last year, china sold 9.5 million vehicles. already this year, 11 million. if it is likely to reach 30 million by the end of the year. the auto show is currently going on in china. car sales are booming, not to sign the big centers, but right around the country. arafat's that stimulus measures will be pulled away -- there are some thoughts that a stimulus asures will be pulled away. >> coming up -- israeli soldiers refused to clear settlers from the west bank. two 0.5 million muslims descend on mecca despite swine flu fears. a sudanese woman who was sentenced to 40 lashes for wearing trousers is in paris to promote her book about the controversy. her sentence was commuted to 1 months in prison, but she was banned from leaving the country, a restriction that she is now openly defying. >> on tour to promote her new book caught. she left secretly to come to paris. the book is called "40 lashes for a pair of trousers." it will not be on sale in sudan. this is why. in july, she was arrested along wi
. it was made in the united states. >> reporter: traditionally, dry wall was made from the white mineral gypsum. in its four form, gypsum emits no gas or odor. bad dry wall, however, is darker. we wanted to compare american and chinese dry wall so we purchased random samples of new american-made dry wall in six u.s. cities and new chinese-made dry wall in china. we also collected samples of dry wall from five damaged homes in the u.s. and had everything sent to the university of florida to be tested by a team of researchers led by professor tim townsend, a scientist and leading expert on the effects of dry wall on the environment. his team spent five months running a multitude of tests on the samples we provided by. the results were revealing. >> it's not as black-and-white as saying the chinese dry wall is bad and all the dry wall is good. >> reporter: as expected, the contaminated chinese samples gave you off high levels of sulr gaza strips. surprisingly, all but one u.s. sample emitted sulfur gases as well. not as levels as high as the chinese product but unexpected. even more surprising...
does this all of this mean for the united states? for sure, we benefit from a more and better educated population overseas. but we also face some risks. because as everybody else invests in higher education, the united states will no longer be the obvious choice for the worlds talent; both students and faculty. i've seen this happen in our own searches for young faculty, lured away by attractive offers from foreign universities. the competition is not exactly fierce today, but if we continue to lose talent, how can we maintain the best universities for your kids and mine? and how can we maintain our edge in innovation and economic competitiveness? let's start by recognizing that the world is different. i'm nada eissa. >> paul: recapping today's market action strong housing data help push stocks higher. the dow gained 132 points and the nasdaq added almost 30 points. to learn more about the stories in tonight's broadcast and to read econo-blogger terri cullen's take on the impact of plunging state revenues go to "nightly business report" on pbs.org. you can also email us at nbr@pbs.org.
cabet, will the united states suort stil the new government. >> well, there are warlos and there arewarlords. there are people w are called that who fought against al eda and the talib and their alli. and there are people who had very serious beaches of human rights and mistrement of people during war, which is always difficulto, you know, lo back on and figure ouhow to judge. >> reporter: a decisn to send 34,0 additional troopsto afghanistan would bepposed by many demrats in congress. secretary of state clinton secretary of defense robert gates, chaman ofthe joint chiefs mik mullen and general mcchrystal are expecte to visit capitohill in an effort to sell thelan. >>> for moren the plan we're joined by juan caos zarate, at the cnter for strategic and international studies in washington. he alsoerved as depu national securit adviser for mbating terrorism during the bush admintration. welcome back. >> thanks, marn. >> reports suggest tat president obama will sd an ditional 30,000 troops to afghanistan. homight these aed forces change the waythe u.s. and nato are conductg
of an existing home in the united states, that's a used home, if you will, is about $173,000 right now. that is down way more than 20% since the peak, but there are a lot of estimates that while home prices will continue to go down over the course of the next year, low-interest rates, low home prices, and this first-time home buyer's credit from the government, if it continues, make this a good time to buy. interest rates right now for a conforming mortgage, one under $417,000 for most of the country, a 30-year mortgage and 20% down, 4.83%. >> ali velshi, thank you. >>> trouble continuing for mark sanford, the governor whose affair with an argentinian lover exploded last year into an international scandal is now facing 37 ethics charges. the civil charges for misuse of campaign money and budget travels carry a maximum of $74,000 in fines. the state attorney general is also weighing whether or not to pursue criminal charges. >>> coming up, toxic danger made in china. homeowners forced to pick their homes or their health. >>> also, getting de-friended on facebook may not be the worst of
in a lot of ways and changed how the rest of the world viewed the united states. but india, a lot of people would say, was a lot more comfortable with the previous president, with president bush, than with president obama. why is that? >> in large measure because president bush had made india a significant foreign policy priority. now what india is witnessing, that it is one of several amongst competing priorities for this president. and, of course, with afghanistan having become a centerpiece of american foreign and security policy, india is not getting the attention that it received during the bush administration, particularly during the second bush administration. so, there's a little bit of unease and concern in new delhi about the stature of the relationship at the moment. >> is he making up for it? i know some of the things he said today in the press conference was talking about a strategic dialogue and a personal partnership when he was talking about things to show how the obama administration is committed to india. but besides that a lot of things people might say are vague, a perso
for the congress of the united states to take a look at your anti-trust exemption. i think you are an $8 billion organization who has not taken seriously your responsibility to the players. the fact of the matter is, yes, people want to play. the fact of the matter is they are going to be injured. and we know no matter what kind of helmet you build or what kind of equipment you have, it is a dangerous sport, and people are going to be injured. the only question is what are you going to do? are you going to pay for it? are you going to pay the injured players and their families for the injures that they have received in helping you to be a multi-billion-dollar operation? that is the only question. i know that you do everything that you possibly can to hold on to those profits, but i think the responsibility of this congress is to take a look at that anti--trust exemption that you have. in my estimation, take it away. i yield back the balance of my time. >> i thank the gentlewoman for her modest suggestions. [laughter] the chair recognizes howard from north carolina. >> thank you, mr. chairman. wh
, with softer economic growth in the united states compared to elsewhere on the sidelines, you probably do continue that trend. ultimately, i like diversification when things are driven differently. right now, we're not getting that. chris and beth ann, thank you so much. >> but at 666 on the s&p -- >> it was -- >> -- calling another big down leg. >> the economists for the year -- >> they're not stock market. >> but they had the growth numbers that are out there. >> i don't think they do, either. if you look at the growth estimates of gdp for the next six months, it has nothing to do with stock prices for the nkts six months. >> but wait a second. if i tell you six months from now, and let's say that you agreed with my forecast, that growth is going to be minus 6%, would that not affect your willingness to buy stocks six months out? >> yes, it would. but psychologically -- >> and i'm telling you that six months ago, the forecast was for plus 3% for the second half of the year and that was something that -- >> why did they turn bearish up 20%? >> who turned bearish? >> all they economists,
agriculture in the main and go to a large farm in the united states farmers use big tractors and big equipment and they plow up the soil and, of course, every time you do that that emits carbon that has been sequestered in the soil. virtually all of the crops around the world and countries and agricultural practices have a role to play. i surely wouldn't limit it to just the developing parts of the world. >> i find it fascinating when you look at the percentage breakdowns. when you go to copenhagen, what are your main goals at the end of the conference as it relates to agriculture? >> for starters, we would like to see agriculture be a big part of the copenhagen landscape. today you follow the press. many people are thinking about copenhagen in the way of industrial emissions and how we produce energy and, of course, that is vitally important part of not only curbing greenhouse gas emissions but solving long-term global warming problems, but agriculture, 1/3 of the total greenhouse gas emissions and it has a role to play. success for us has it being more of the agenda. >> you think you are und
that are are unpopular. and he's a president of the united states being told by the military, mr. president, we can't defend those outposts and we need more people to do a countersurge insurgency. and i guess it these are correct and they puts 43,000 troops in, imagine the progressiveness, with the troops, if you don't advance health care. i think he'll find 10,000 and train the army because he's politically unsustainable with his base, if he puts in 43,000 troops and prosecutes afghanistan during a water with afghanistan as president, i think he'll have a democrat primary and that we'll have a substantial split mountain democrat party, if that's what he does. and i would argue this -- for our party, and the tensions between our kind of economic votes and our religious conservatives, the fact that the energy in republican party is about spending and deficit, if we're so inept we can't take these people and make them part of a new coalition, they we oughting to nothinged. the -- this are 24% of the people in this country who say they would likely vote for a third party and they're not strong republi
of which the united states has a surplus of. >> that's why we had all those treasury actions today. to finance stuff. >> on that note, happy thanksgiving. >> so depressed. we're having a drunk turkey later on. maybe you should hang around for that after that discussion. >>> more young adults are heading home for the holidays and staying there. a new pew research poll finds 10% of people 35 and younger say they moved back home with their parents because of the recession. that's not the only life change they're making. 12% got a roommate. 15% put off getting married. 14% delayed having a baby. >> although if you get married doesn't that double your income? >> i guess. but you got to pay for the wedding. >> no. elope. >>> a washington espresso stand is making a buzz. some parents in the city are not happy because it opened across from a public playground and a day care center where they've never seen women in swim suits. not the first of its kind either in the area. but the location draws protests at city council meetings. there it is. >> i wonder why they only have video through the
're the laggard. the u.s. is different. >> rose: everybody wonders, they look at china and the united states and they wonder where the demand will come for all these chinese products and if it's not coming from the united states, what will be the impact of that and if it's coming from somewhere else, what will be the impact of it? >> well, the... i mean, the conventional wisdom is that the chinese economy is a bubble and we're in the stage where everybody knows about bubbles, everybody sees bubbles everywhere. they think china is a bubble. but i don't think so. and there are clear signs that domestic demand in china is picking up. so that chinese products, some of those chinese products that they were exporting to the rest of the world are going to be consumed internally in china. so the chinese economy is making the transition from being an export and investment-led economy to being a domestic demand driven economy. and that's global... >> rose: is it going to the point of being a demand driven economy? is it just taking the first few steps towards it? >> i'm not sure these exactly the righ
tonight with potential danger for democrats pushing for health care reform in the united states senate. senate democrats scored a major victory saturday night in their vote to allow debate to go forward on health reform. democrats needed every member of their caucus to stay in line, and they did. that, it turns out, was the easy part. the hard part, getting every one of those senators to stay on board to allow the final vote on health care reform. as things stand tonight, that will not happen. tonight, four members of the democratic caucus are pledging to block that final vote if the public option that's in the bill stays in the bill. perhaps as a result tonight, there is growing talk about compromise. this dead lock in the democratic caucus has reportedly led majority party harry reid to begin searching fortwo possible compromise solutions. one is the triggered option offered by senator olympia snowe of maine and the other by democratic senator tom carper of delaware. at this point, the pressure is on harry reid to deliver on the reform that he's been promising. after saturday night's
that occurd in the united states as a result of the rdware, the plastic hardware either breaking or being installed improperly. the drop side drops down and it is possible that a child can become trapped between the drop side and the mattress, and can sufficient case and that has, unfortunately, happened in a number of incidents here. this is a major call. there are many who are questioning the drop side model entirely. and whether or not that is safe. we'll have more on that coming up in the next half hour. back to you in the studio. >> thank you, meagan. >>> now to the war in afghanistan. this morning, we're hearing the president will announce his new strategy within days. president barack obama met with top advisers yesterday in a final major constitution before the announcement. military officials expect the new strategy to include up to 35,000 u.s. forces. the announcement will likely happen when congress returns after thanksgiving next week. >>> a water main break has some drivers in for a messy commute this morning in arlington. a pipe burst near the north glebe road intersection,
for millions of americans to come on the roll to have the same kinds of plans we have in the united states senate. i have a bill right now that i plan to offer as an amendment if the -- if the situation occurs that i can. and i would like to see health care reform. i ran on health care reform, and i would love to see appropriate health care reform occur. >> well, here's the problem. 39 republicans, including you, voted unanimously friday night not even to bring up the health care reform bill, and your party has been in power many years with reagan and later with george w. bush. you have controlled both houses of congress, and never did you do health reform. and now you go out there and complain and vote unanimously against the democrats, even bringing the bill up for debate. how can you defend your party, your party, on health reform when they never have done anything? >> well, i'm just -- i can only speak for myself, chris. >> well, you can't. you voted with your party. are you a republican, sir? >> yeah. >> well, your party. explain its positions over the years. over your years your part
no better friend than the united states. >> india will play a pivotal role in meeting the major challenges we face today. this includes my top economic priority. creating good jobs with good wages for the american people. so i believe that the relationship between the united states and india will be one of the defining partnerships of the 21st century. >> tonight's black tie affair on the white house south lawn in that structure is expected to draw 320 of washington and hollywood elite. and headlines the night's entertainment lineup, grammy winner jennifer hudson. nbc's norah o'donnell joins us live from washington. in terms of culture, is there a reason why the administration picked india? that maybe it means more to indians in terms of culture than, say, other countries? >> reporter: yeah. india, of course, the world's second largest or the world's largest democracy. the u.s. the other world's largest democracy. and so that was important. also because it's very important as a global economic power house. so that's one way -- that's one reason that the white house chose india to honor the
anxiety, andrea, because they are afraid that the united states has bigger fish to fry in the region than india. they're very upset about the china trip. some of the biggest criticisms of the united states came from new delhi that the u.s. and, of course, to the west. afghanistan and pakistan. india has a very, as you pointed out, tense relationship with pakistan. the overwhelming majority of pakistani troops are on the border with india and not in the northwest frontier fighting this taliban insurgency. the mumbai attacks of a year ago were inspired by groups in pakistan. in the 1990s, pakistan even intervened and took a chunk out of indian territory and almost caused a gigantic war. so, india wants to be assured that our policy tour china is not going to marginalize indian concerns and also the policy of helping pakistan fight insurgents on its territory is not going to cause heartache in india about pakistani intervention in india. so, india has a lot of concerns. it's not a place where president obama is especially popular right now. >> well, thank you very much. steve weisman, jim ho
and japanese? why do the indians? why do other countries want to build their plants in the united states? i say, because we're at a better cost advantage. we can't beat china and a few others yet. but ironically, the weaker dollar will help us long term. >> steve, i've left you until last. what should we make of what's going on. not for getting employment is above 10%, despite the bullish activity on the stock market. >> a weak dollar means a weak economy. we should have learned that from the 1970's. it's a job killer as well in terms of denying businesses access to capital, they speculate in commodities and currencies instead of investing in businesses. that's why you get some overseas investment, overall the for reign capital the weak dollar is poison. it introduces too muchen certainty. in terms of exports by artificially lowering the price of your exports you more than make up with the disastrous distortions you get in the domestic economy. so in the 1970s we'll have rallies. when a rotten decade it was. ronald reagan strengthened the dollar and we had a good run in the 1980s. >> simply off
. >> rose: everybody wonders they look at china and the united states and theyonder where the demand wilcome for all these chinese produc and if it' not cong from the united state at will be the imct of that and ift's coming fm someere else, what will be the impact ofit? >> well, the... i mean, the convential wisdom is that the chinese economy is bubble and we're in the stage where everybody knows about bubbles, evybody sees bubbles everhere. they thinkhina is a bube. but i don't think so. and there are clear signs at domest demand in china is picking up. so that chise products, some of those chinese pducts that they we exporting to the rt of theorld are going to be nsumed internally in china. the chinese economy is ming the transitionfrom being a port and iestment-led economy to bei a domestic demand dven economy. and that's global... >>ose: is it going to the point of bei a dand driven economy? is it just taking the first few steps tords it? >> i'm noture these exaly the right numbers but domestic demand amounted to 25% or 30% of grossomestic oduct. it's now this yeart will be up around 40
the outlet of coming to the united states for any care they need. they have the united states inventing pharmaceuticals that europe and canada will never invent because they don't have the profit system there. without the united states, there will nobody relief for people who have to wait for three years to get a c.a.t. scan. there will nobody relief for people who want a drug that will never be invented because national health care passes. what i said was for the transition, for the tough cases i would rather have one fund that pays these few rare cases rather than wreck the entire system for everyone. i mean everyone on earth. which is what the democrat plan will do. over time, what you do if you don't like the insurance companies, make them compete. you make apple compete with microsoft and suddenly everybody has a computer for $200. you make cell phones compete, suddenly everything is cheap and easily available. somehow prices do not come down and services do not improve when the government is running things. >> larry: al, isn't it the insurance lobby that prevents competition? >> i
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